History & Purpose

History & Purpose

History

The American Osteopathic Board of Radiology (AOBR) is 1 of 18 approved specialty boards of the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). The AOA, through its certifying body, the Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists (BOS), is the primary source of certification for osteopathic physicians.

The formation of the AOBR represented the founding of the first specialty examining board within the osteopathic profession. In October, 1939, the AOBR was formally organized at Atlantic City, New Jersey. Members of the first board were Floyd J. Trenery, DO, President, C.A. Tedrick, DO, Secretary-Treasurer and Paul T. Lloyd, DO, member. The Board conducted its first examinations in St. Louis and Philadelphia in 1940. By 1941 a sufficient number of radiologists had become certified and therefore diplomates of the Board to warrant the organization of a college of radiology. Thus the American Osteopathic College of Radiology (AOCR) was founded at Detroit, Michigan, early in 1941. In 1964 Board membership was increased from 3 members to 9.

The AOCR began to reorganize its aims and purposes along the needs for evaluation and educational standards for documented training of radiology residents, and the establishing of postgraduate education courses for the radiologist in practice in the 1970’s. During the same time period, the AOBR established criteria for selection of examiners based on their demonstrated expertise in residency training, education, and the practice of radiology.

By the process of evolution the examining board moved from a subjective form of examination to an objective form of examination. Emphasis was placed on the written examination, and the individual’s clinical application of his or her knowledge in each of the areas examined. The examinations were expanded to include nuclear medicine, angiography, ultrasound, computerized axial tomography, interventional radiology, and magnetic resonance imaging. Radiation Therapy became a separate and distinct specialty, Radiation Oncology. Examination for certification by the board is now in 2 primary areas: Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Oncology.

In cooperation with the AOCR Committee on Evaluation and Educational Standards subspecialty training criteria was established and approved by the AOA. The AOBR began examination for subspecialty recognition in 1983. The subspecialty of Angiography and Interventional Radiology was renamed Vascular and Interventional Radiology and Diagnostic Ultrasound was discontinued in 1998. In 2006, the examinations in Body Imaging and Nuclear Radiology were approved by the AOA for dormancy status. The AOBR is now approved by the AOA to give examinations for subspecialty recognition in Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Neuroradiology, and Pediatric Radiology.

The AOBR is composed of AOBR certified representatives from academic faculties, hospitals and residency training programs. There are also representatives that are both AOBR and ABR certified and trained in ACGME training programs approved by the AOA. The AOBR strives to recruit the most qualified radiologists as examiners in their area of expertise or subspecialty practice.

As Paul T. Lloyd, DO, stated in his History of the American Osteopathic Board of Radiology – The First Quarter Century: “Times have greatly changed; conditions referable to the practice of radiology have altered and are altering constantly, and ever so rapidly.” The AOBR, working hand in hand with the AOCR, is striving to meet the continuing challenge of change. We will be able to ensure the future of osteopathic radiology by setting those standards of training and examination for certification to meet the advances of radiology and medical imaging for providing quality health care to the patients and physicians we serve as we move into the twenty-first century.

The AOBR is authorized by the AOA to examine candidates for certification and make recommendations to the Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists. The Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists functions under the auspices of the AOA Board of Trustees from which it receives its purposes and authority.

Purposes

  • Define the qualifications required of osteopathic physicians for certification in the specialties of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Oncology and the subspecialties of Diagnostic Radiology: Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Neuroradiology, and Pediatric Radiology leading to certification of added qualifications and any other specialty, subspecialty, and/or certification of added qualifications that may be assigned to the Board.
  • Determine the qualifications required of osteopathic physicians for certification in the specialties of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Oncology and the subspecialties of Diagnostic Radiology: Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Neuroradiology, and Pediatric Radiology leading to certification of added qualifications and any other specialty, subspecialty, and/or certification of added qualifications that may be assigned to the Board.
  • Conduct examinations in conformity with the Policies and Procedures of the Board.
  • Issue certificates, subject to the approval of the Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists of the AOA (hereinafter referred to as the Bureau), to those osteopathic physicians who are found qualified.
  • Recommend revocation of certificates for cause.
  • Use every means possible to maintain a high standard of practice within the osteopathic profession.
  • Maintain a recertification process, as approved by the Bureau and AOA Board of Trustees. Issue certificates, subject to the approval of the Bureau, of recertification to candidates who successfully complete the recertification process subject to the approval of the Bureau.